Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Narrative therapy in practice : the archaeology of hope / Gerald Monk [and others], editors.

Contributor(s): Monk, Gerald, 1954-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: San Francisco, Calif. : Jossey-Bass Publishers, ©1997Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxviii, 320 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0787903132; 9780787903138.Subject(s): Narrative therapy | Personal construct therapy | Metaphor -- Therapeutic use | Psychotherapy | Counseling | Psychotherapy -- methods | Counseling -- methods | Metaphor | CounselingDDC classification: 616.8914 Other classification: 77.84 Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description
Contents:
How narrative therapy works / Gerald Monk -- The theoretical story of narrative therapy / Wendy Drewery and John Winslade -- The therapeutic relationship / John Winslade, Kathie Crocket, and Gerald Monk -- Learning and teaching narrative ideas / Wally McKenzie and Gerald Monk -- Leila and the tiger: narrative approaches to psychiatry / Glen J. Simblett -- Countering alcoholic narratives / John Winslade and Lorraine Smith.
Therapy with male sexual abuse survivors: contesting oppressive life stories / Tim Harker -- School counseling in a narrative mode / John Winslade and Aileen Cheshire -- Appreciating indigenous knowledge in groups / Glen Silvester -- Moving from problem solving to narrative approaches in mediation / John Winslade and Alison Cotter -- Health-promoting conversations / Bev McKenzie -- Epilogue / Wendy Drewery.
Review: "Narrative therapy, first introduced by Australia's Michael White and New Zealand's David Epston more than ten years ago, is based on the idea that problems are manufactured in social, cultural, and political contexts. Each person produces the meaning of his or her own life from the stories that are available in these contexts. As Narrative Therapy in Practice demonstrates, it is the spirit of collaboration that guides clinicians who use this innovative approach. Together they work to help clients unearth competencies, talents, abilities, and resources and create a transformed "redescription" of themselves. The information presented is grounded in solid theories and research in learning, language, and cognitive behavior. Using practical examples, clinicians are shown how narrative therapy can be applied in a variety of situations such as treating alcoholics, group counseling, work with indigenous native communities, and treating male sexual abuse survivors."--Jacket.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book *Schaff Library
Stacks
RC 489 .S74 N37 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 30092101143627
Total holds: 0

The editors are New Zealanders.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

How narrative therapy works / Gerald Monk -- The theoretical story of narrative therapy / Wendy Drewery and John Winslade -- The therapeutic relationship / John Winslade, Kathie Crocket, and Gerald Monk -- Learning and teaching narrative ideas / Wally McKenzie and Gerald Monk -- Leila and the tiger: narrative approaches to psychiatry / Glen J. Simblett -- Countering alcoholic narratives / John Winslade and Lorraine Smith.

Therapy with male sexual abuse survivors: contesting oppressive life stories / Tim Harker -- School counseling in a narrative mode / John Winslade and Aileen Cheshire -- Appreciating indigenous knowledge in groups / Glen Silvester -- Moving from problem solving to narrative approaches in mediation / John Winslade and Alison Cotter -- Health-promoting conversations / Bev McKenzie -- Epilogue / Wendy Drewery.

"Narrative therapy, first introduced by Australia's Michael White and New Zealand's David Epston more than ten years ago, is based on the idea that problems are manufactured in social, cultural, and political contexts. Each person produces the meaning of his or her own life from the stories that are available in these contexts. As Narrative Therapy in Practice demonstrates, it is the spirit of collaboration that guides clinicians who use this innovative approach. Together they work to help clients unearth competencies, talents, abilities, and resources and create a transformed "redescription" of themselves. The information presented is grounded in solid theories and research in learning, language, and cognitive behavior. Using practical examples, clinicians are shown how narrative therapy can be applied in a variety of situations such as treating alcoholics, group counseling, work with indigenous native communities, and treating male sexual abuse survivors."--Jacket.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

This online catalog is a consortial partnership of the following organizations:
Lancaster Theological Seminary • 555 West James St., Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717-290-8707
E&R Historical Society • 2nd floor, Schaff Library Building, 555 West James St., Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717-290-8734

Powered by Koha