Interracialism and Christian community in the postwar South : the story of Koinonia Farm / Tracy Elaine K'Meyer.

By: K'Meyer, Tracy Elaine
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 1997Description: x, 236 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0813917123; 9780813917122; 0813920027; 9780813920023Subject(s): Koinonia Farm -- History | Christian communities -- Georgia -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- History -- 20th century | Race relations -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- History -- 20th century | Georgia -- Race relations | Georgia -- Church history -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 261.8/348/009758913 LOC classification: BV4407.67 | .K54 1997
Contents:
Introduction -- Beginnings, 1942-56 -- Roots -- The word -- Incarnation -- Christian community -- The crisis, 1956-58 -- The crucible -- A fellowship of believers -- To bear witness -- New challenges, new directions, 1958-68 -- Wandering in the desert -- Koinonia and the movement -- Partners.
Review: "When one thinks of southern religion, two images usually spring to mind: rigidly separated black and white congregations and a Bible Belt dominated by conservative white Protestant Christianity. Yet beginning in the postwar years and culminating in the civil rights movement, there were black and white Christians and activists seeking ways to create a "beloved community" based on racial equality. In Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South, Tracy Elaine K'Meyer looks at one such effort, Koinonia Farm, an interracial Christian cooperative founded in 1942 by two white Baptist ministers in southwest Georgia."--BOOK JACKET. "K'Meyer provides a compelling portrait of Koinonia Farm during its period of greatest influence, from its early 1940s origins in the mind of its principal founder, Clarence Jordan, to its metamorphosis into Koinonia Partners in 1968. Its story touches upon three themes in southern history - religion, race relations, and community - and challenges common understandings of each. In particular, this book contributes to the literature on the early civil rights movement, white liberalism, and interracialism and presents a fascinating case of religious belief informing progressive social action."--BOOK JACKET.
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BV 4407.67 .K54 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 30092101140821
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 222-230) and index.

Introduction -- Beginnings, 1942-56 -- Roots -- The word -- Incarnation -- Christian community -- The crisis, 1956-58 -- The crucible -- A fellowship of believers -- To bear witness -- New challenges, new directions, 1958-68 -- Wandering in the desert -- Koinonia and the movement -- Partners.

"When one thinks of southern religion, two images usually spring to mind: rigidly separated black and white congregations and a Bible Belt dominated by conservative white Protestant Christianity. Yet beginning in the postwar years and culminating in the civil rights movement, there were black and white Christians and activists seeking ways to create a "beloved community" based on racial equality. In Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South, Tracy Elaine K'Meyer looks at one such effort, Koinonia Farm, an interracial Christian cooperative founded in 1942 by two white Baptist ministers in southwest Georgia."--BOOK JACKET. "K'Meyer provides a compelling portrait of Koinonia Farm during its period of greatest influence, from its early 1940s origins in the mind of its principal founder, Clarence Jordan, to its metamorphosis into Koinonia Partners in 1968. Its story touches upon three themes in southern history - religion, race relations, and community - and challenges common understandings of each. In particular, this book contributes to the literature on the early civil rights movement, white liberalism, and interracialism and presents a fascinating case of religious belief informing progressive social action."--BOOK JACKET.

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