Normal view MARC view ISBD view

“We Want What Everybody Else in an Advanced Society Seems to Have” : Why Chinese Democracy Is Inevitable / Michael T. Davis.

By: Davis, Michael T.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: New Global Studies; 9(1).Publisher: Berlin ; Boston : De Gruyter, 2015Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: onlineresourceISSN: 1940-0004.Subject(s): Chinese democracy | eighteenth-century BritainOnline resources: De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility In: New Global Studies 9(1), pp. 57-71Summary: Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.Abstract: With the recent pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, here is one of the most intriguing questions of our time – what is China’s political destiny? For some, the answer seems self-evident: world domination. Martin Jacques and many other China watchers say it is not “if” but “when China rules the world”. But the burning question is, how will China rule itself? How will it survive as a stable and centralized state through its economic and global make-over as a superpower? What will the political future of this vast and rapidly evolving nation look like? Will China have a democracy? Perhaps the answers to these questions can be found in another time and place – in Britain during the so-called long eighteenth century (1688–1832) – where we can see parallels between the forces that helped transform Britain into the global superpower of the nineteenth century and those that underpin China’s modern-day transformation. This article argues that these forces will set China on the path to democracy in the same way they helped change the political dimensions of Britain.
List(s) this item appears in: DeGruyter Rights, Action and Social Responsibility Collection
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Notes Date due Item holds
E-book E-book *Schaff Library
Available Open Access until 12/31/2017: Click link above
Total holds: 0

journal article

Published Online: 17.03.2015

Free access to a collection across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility.

Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.

With the recent pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, here is one of the most intriguing questions of our time – what is China’s political destiny? For some, the answer seems self-evident: world domination. Martin Jacques and many other China watchers say it is not “if” but “when China rules the world”. But the burning question is, how will China rule itself? How will it survive as a stable and centralized state through its economic and global make-over as a superpower? What will the political future of this vast and rapidly evolving nation look like? Will China have a democracy? Perhaps the answers to these questions can be found in another time and place – in Britain during the so-called long eighteenth century (1688–1832) – where we can see parallels between the forces that helped transform Britain into the global superpower of the nineteenth century and those that underpin China’s modern-day transformation. This article argues that these forces will set China on the path to democracy in the same way they helped change the political dimensions of Britain.

In English.

In "New Global Studies", 9(1), pp. 57-71

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

This online catalog is a consortial partnership of the following organizations:
Lancaster Theological Seminary • 555 West James St., Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717-290-8707
E&R Historical Society • 2nd floor, Schaff Library Building, 555 West James St., Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717-290-8734

Powered by Koha