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A Public Empire : Property and the Quest for the Common Good in Imperial Russia / Ekaterina Pravilova.

By: Pravilova, Ekaterina [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Edition: Course Book.Description: 1 online resource(448 p.) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400850266.Subject(s): Government ownership -- Russia -- History | Public domain -- Russia -- History | Right of property -- Russia -- History | General European History | Government ownership | History | Public domain | Regional History | Right of property | Wirtschaft | Business & Economics / Real Estate / GeneralDDC classification: 333.10947/09034 Online resources: De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Introduction. Res Publica in the Imperial State -- Part I. Whose Nature? -- 1. The Meanings of Property -- 2. Forests, Minerals, and the Controversy over Property in Post-Emancipation Russia -- 3. Nationalizing Rivers, Expropriating Lands -- Part II. The Treasures of the Fatherland -- 4. Inventing National Patrimony -- 5. Private Possessions and National Art -- Part III. “Estates on Parnassus” -- 6. Writers and the Audience -- 7. The Private Letters of National Literature -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Index
Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package 2014-2015Title is part of eBook package:Princeton eBook Package Backlist 2000-2014Summary: "Property rights" and "Russia" do not usually belong in the same sentence. Rather, our general image of the nation is of insecurity of private ownership and defenselessness in the face of the state. Many scholars have attributed Russia’s long-term development problems to a failure to advance property rights for the modern age and blamed Russian intellectuals for their indifference to the issues of ownership. A Public Empire refutes this widely shared conventional wisdom and analyzes the emergence of Russian property regimes from the time of Catherine the Great through World War I and the revolutions of 1917. Most importantly, A Public Empire shows the emergence of the new practices of owning "public things" in imperial Russia and the attempts of Russian intellectuals to reconcile the security of property with the ideals of the common good. The book analyzes how the belief that certain objects—rivers, forests, minerals, historical monuments, icons, and Russian literary classics—should accede to some kind of public status developed in Russia in the mid-nineteenth century. Professional experts and liberal politicians advocated for a property reform that aimed at exempting public things from private ownership, while the tsars and the imperial government employed the rhetoric of protecting the sanctity of private property and resisted attempts at its limitation. Exploring the Russian ways of thinking about property, A Public Empire looks at problems of state reform and the formation of civil society, which, as the book argues, should be rethought as a process of constructing "the public" through the reform of property rights.Summary: Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.
List(s) this item appears in: DeGruyter Rights, Action and Social Responsibility Collection
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Introduction. Res Publica in the Imperial State -- Part I. Whose Nature? -- 1. The Meanings of Property -- 2. Forests, Minerals, and the Controversy over Property in Post-Emancipation Russia -- 3. Nationalizing Rivers, Expropriating Lands -- Part II. The Treasures of the Fatherland -- 4. Inventing National Patrimony -- 5. Private Possessions and National Art -- Part III. “Estates on Parnassus” -- 6. Writers and the Audience -- 7. The Private Letters of National Literature -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Index

Free access to a collection across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility.

"Property rights" and "Russia" do not usually belong in the same sentence. Rather, our general image of the nation is of insecurity of private ownership and defenselessness in the face of the state. Many scholars have attributed Russia’s long-term development problems to a failure to advance property rights for the modern age and blamed Russian intellectuals for their indifference to the issues of ownership. A Public Empire refutes this widely shared conventional wisdom and analyzes the emergence of Russian property regimes from the time of Catherine the Great through World War I and the revolutions of 1917. Most importantly, A Public Empire shows the emergence of the new practices of owning "public things" in imperial Russia and the attempts of Russian intellectuals to reconcile the security of property with the ideals of the common good. The book analyzes how the belief that certain objects—rivers, forests, minerals, historical monuments, icons, and Russian literary classics—should accede to some kind of public status developed in Russia in the mid-nineteenth century. Professional experts and liberal politicians advocated for a property reform that aimed at exempting public things from private ownership, while the tsars and the imperial government employed the rhetoric of protecting the sanctity of private property and resisted attempts at its limitation. Exploring the Russian ways of thinking about property, A Public Empire looks at problems of state reform and the formation of civil society, which, as the book argues, should be rethought as a process of constructing "the public" through the reform of property rights.

Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.

Electronic reproduction. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 2014. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Web browser. Access may be restricted to users at subscribing institutions.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

PravilovaEkaterina: Ekaterina Pravilova is associate professor of history at Princeton University.

In English.

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