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A Long Goodbye : The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan / Artemy M. Kalinovsky.

By: Kalinovsky, Artemy M [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, [2011]Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource(320p.) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674061040.Subject(s): Disengagement (Military science) -- Case studies | Geschichte Asiens | Disengagement (Military science) -- Case studies | General European History | History | Regional History | HISTORY -- Modern -- 20th Century | HISTORY -- Asia -- General | HISTORY -- Asia -- Central AsiaDDC classification: 958.104/5 | 958.104/5 Online resources: De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility
Contents:
Frontmatter -- CONTENTS -- Introduction -- 1 The Reluctant Intervention -- 2 The Turn toward Diplomacy -- 3 Gorbachev Confronts Afghanistan -- 4 The National Reconciliation Campaign -- 5 Engaging with the Americans -- 6 The Army Withdraws and the Politburo Debates -- 7 Soviet Policy Adrift -- Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- A Note on Sources -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index.
Title is part of eBook package:E-BOOK GESAMTPAKET / COMPLETE PACKAGE 2011Title is part of eBook package:E-BOOK PACKAGE ENGLISH LANGUAGES TITLES 2011Title is part of eBook package:E-BOOK PAKET PHILOSOPHIE UND GESCHICHTE 2011Title is part of eBook package:HUP Complete eBook Package 2011-2014Title is part of eBook package:HUP eBook Package 2011Title is part of eBook package:HUP eBook Package Backlist 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:HUP eBook Package Backlist 2000-2014Summary: Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.Summary: The conflict in Afghanistan looms large in the collective consciousness of Americans. What has the United States achieved, and how will it withdraw without sacrificing those gains? The Soviet Union confronted these same questions in the 1980s, and Artemy Kalinovsky’s history of the USSR’s nine-year struggle to extricate itself from Afghanistan and bring its troops home provides a sobering perspective on exit options in the region.What makes Kalinovsky’s intense account both timely and important is its focus not on motives for initiating the conflict but on the factors that prevented the Soviet leadership from ending a demoralizing war. Why did the USSR linger for so long, given that key elites recognized the blunder of the mission shortly after the initial deployment?Newly available archival material, supplemented by interviews with major actors, allows Kalinovsky to reconstruct the fierce debates among Soviet diplomats, KGB officials, the Red Army, and top Politburo figures. The fear that withdrawal would diminish the USSR’s status as leader of the Third World is palpable in these disagreements, as are the competing interests of Afghan factions and the Soviet Union’s superpower rival in the West. This book challenges many widely held views about the actual costs of the conflict to the Soviet leadership, and its findings illuminate the Cold War context of a military engagement that went very wrong, for much too long.Summary: Why did the USSR linger so long in Afghanistan? What makes this account of the Soviet-Afghan conflict both timely and important is its focus on the factors that prevented the Soviet leadership from ending a demoralizing and costly war and on the long-term consequences for the Soviet Union and the region.
List(s) this item appears in: DeGruyter Rights, Action and Social Responsibility Collection
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Frontmatter -- CONTENTS -- Introduction -- 1 The Reluctant Intervention -- 2 The Turn toward Diplomacy -- 3 Gorbachev Confronts Afghanistan -- 4 The National Reconciliation Campaign -- 5 Engaging with the Americans -- 6 The Army Withdraws and the Politburo Debates -- 7 Soviet Policy Adrift -- Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- Notes -- A Note on Sources -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments -- Index.

Free access to a collection across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility.

Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.

The conflict in Afghanistan looms large in the collective consciousness of Americans. What has the United States achieved, and how will it withdraw without sacrificing those gains? The Soviet Union confronted these same questions in the 1980s, and Artemy Kalinovsky’s history of the USSR’s nine-year struggle to extricate itself from Afghanistan and bring its troops home provides a sobering perspective on exit options in the region.What makes Kalinovsky’s intense account both timely and important is its focus not on motives for initiating the conflict but on the factors that prevented the Soviet leadership from ending a demoralizing war. Why did the USSR linger for so long, given that key elites recognized the blunder of the mission shortly after the initial deployment?Newly available archival material, supplemented by interviews with major actors, allows Kalinovsky to reconstruct the fierce debates among Soviet diplomats, KGB officials, the Red Army, and top Politburo figures. The fear that withdrawal would diminish the USSR’s status as leader of the Third World is palpable in these disagreements, as are the competing interests of Afghan factions and the Soviet Union’s superpower rival in the West. This book challenges many widely held views about the actual costs of the conflict to the Soviet leadership, and its findings illuminate the Cold War context of a military engagement that went very wrong, for much too long.

Why did the USSR linger so long in Afghanistan? What makes this account of the Soviet-Afghan conflict both timely and important is its focus on the factors that prevented the Soviet leadership from ending a demoralizing and costly war and on the long-term consequences for the Soviet Union and the region.

Electronic reproduction. : Harvard University Press, 2011. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Web browser. Access may be restricted to users at subscribing institutions.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

KalinovskyArtemy M.: Artemy Kalinovsky is Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam and Research Associate at the Cold War Studies Programme at the London School of Economics and Politics.

In English.

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