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Abandoned to Lust : Sexual Slander and Ancient Christianity / Jennifer Wright Knust.

By: Knust, Jennifer Wright.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Gender, Theory, and Religion.Publisher: New York, NY : Columbia University Press, [2005]Copyright date: ©2005Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231510042.Subject(s): Libel and slander -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- History | Libel and slander -- Rome | Sex -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- History of doctrines -- Early church, ca. 30-600 | Sex -- RomeDDC classification: 241/.66 Online resources: De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- List of Abbreviations -- Introduction: Who’S on Top? Sex Talk, Power, and Resistance -- 1. Sexual Slander and Ancient Invective -- 2. Paul, the Slaves of Desire, and the Saints of God -- 3. Sexual Vice and Christian Apologia -- 4. The False Teachers of the End Time -- 5. Illicit Sex, Wicked Desire, and the Demonized Heretic -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index
Title is part of eBook package:CUP eBook Package Backlist 2000-2013Title is part of eBook package:CUP eBook Package Backlist 2000-2014Summary: Early Christians used charges of adultery, incest, and lascivious behavior to demonize their opponents, police insiders, resist pagan rulers, and define what it meant to be a Christian. Christians frequently claimed that they, and they alone were sexually virtuous, comparing themselves to those marked as outsiders, especially non-believers and "heretics," who were said to be controlled by lust and unable to rein in their carnal desires. True or not, these charges allowed Christians to present themselves as different from and morally superior to those around them. Through careful, innovative readings, Jennifer Knust explores the writings of Paul, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus of Lyons, and other early Christian authors who argued that Christ alone made self-mastery possible. Rejection of Christ led to both immoral sexual behavior and, ultimately, alienation and punishment from God. Knust considers how Christian writers participated in a long tradition of rhetorical invective, a rhetoric that was often employed to defend status and difference. Christians borrowed, deployed, and reconfigured classical rhetorical techniques, turning them against their rulers to undercut their moral and political authority. Knust also examines the use of accusations of licentiousness in conflicts between rival groups of Christians. Portraying rival sects as depraved allowed accusers to claim their own group as representative of "true Christianity." Knust's book also reveals the ways in which sexual slurs and their use in early Christian writings reflected cultural and gendered assumptions about what constituted purity, morality, and truth. In doing so, Abandoned to Lust highlights the complex interrelationships between sex, gender, and sexuality within the classical, biblical, and early-Christian traditions.Summary: Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.
List(s) this item appears in: DeGruyter Rights, Action and Social Responsibility Collection
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Frontmatter -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- List of Abbreviations -- Introduction: Who’S on Top? Sex Talk, Power, and Resistance -- 1. Sexual Slander and Ancient Invective -- 2. Paul, the Slaves of Desire, and the Saints of God -- 3. Sexual Vice and Christian Apologia -- 4. The False Teachers of the End Time -- 5. Illicit Sex, Wicked Desire, and the Demonized Heretic -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

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Early Christians used charges of adultery, incest, and lascivious behavior to demonize their opponents, police insiders, resist pagan rulers, and define what it meant to be a Christian. Christians frequently claimed that they, and they alone were sexually virtuous, comparing themselves to those marked as outsiders, especially non-believers and "heretics," who were said to be controlled by lust and unable to rein in their carnal desires. True or not, these charges allowed Christians to present themselves as different from and morally superior to those around them. Through careful, innovative readings, Jennifer Knust explores the writings of Paul, Justin Martyr, Irenaeus of Lyons, and other early Christian authors who argued that Christ alone made self-mastery possible. Rejection of Christ led to both immoral sexual behavior and, ultimately, alienation and punishment from God. Knust considers how Christian writers participated in a long tradition of rhetorical invective, a rhetoric that was often employed to defend status and difference. Christians borrowed, deployed, and reconfigured classical rhetorical techniques, turning them against their rulers to undercut their moral and political authority. Knust also examines the use of accusations of licentiousness in conflicts between rival groups of Christians. Portraying rival sects as depraved allowed accusers to claim their own group as representative of "true Christianity." Knust's book also reveals the ways in which sexual slurs and their use in early Christian writings reflected cultural and gendered assumptions about what constituted purity, morality, and truth. In doing so, Abandoned to Lust highlights the complex interrelationships between sex, gender, and sexuality within the classical, biblical, and early-Christian traditions.

Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility: Public debates surrounding immigration policy, climate change, international relations, and constitutional and human rights are currently at the forefront of our national discourse. Critical reasoning, supported through academic research is needed. As a result, De Gruyter, along with its partner presses, is making freely available books and journal articles across nine topical areas for all students and faculty. Broadening access to this scholarship enables more people to address these issues in an informed manner: it helps us combat false news sources, to consider the nature of truth and ethics, and to understand the struggles of all members of society.

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.

In English.

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Other editions of this work

Abandoned to lust : by Knust, Jennifer Wright, ©2006

Columbia University Press, (New York :) xviii. 279 p. ; 24 cm.

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E&R Historical Society • 2nd floor, Schaff Library Building, 555 West James St., Lancaster, PA 17603 • 717-290-8734

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