Black students-Middle class teachers / by Jawanza Kunjufu.

By: Kunjufu, Jawanza
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago, Ill. : African American Images, ©2002Description: xii, 164 pages : illustrations ; 22 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0913543810; 9780913543818Subject(s): African Americans -- Education | African American children -- Education | Self-esteem in children | Home and school -- United StatesDDC classification: 371.829/96073 LOC classification: LC2731 | .K86 2002
Contents:
Middle-class schools -- White female teachers -- African American teachers -- Master teachers -- A relevant black curriculum -- African American students -- African American parents -- Models of success.
Summary: This compelling look at the relationship between the majority of African American students and their teachers provides answers and solutions to the hard-hitting questions facing education in today's black and mixed-race communities. Are teachers prepared by their college education departments to teach African American children? Are schools designed for middle-class children and, if so, what are the implications for the 50 percent of African Americans who live below the poverty line? Is the major issue between teachers and students class or racial difference? Why do some of the lowest test scores come from classrooms where black educators are teaching black students? How can parents negotiate with schools to prevent having their children placed in special education programs? Also included are teaching techniques and a list of exemplary schools that are successfully educating African Americans.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book @LancSemLibrary
Stacks
LC 2731 .K86 2002 (Browse shelf) Available Gift of Dr. Rebecca H. Meyer 30092101125228
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 157-160) and index.

Middle-class schools -- White female teachers -- African American teachers -- Master teachers -- A relevant black curriculum -- African American students -- African American parents -- Models of success.

This compelling look at the relationship between the majority of African American students and their teachers provides answers and solutions to the hard-hitting questions facing education in today's black and mixed-race communities. Are teachers prepared by their college education departments to teach African American children? Are schools designed for middle-class children and, if so, what are the implications for the 50 percent of African Americans who live below the poverty line? Is the major issue between teachers and students class or racial difference? Why do some of the lowest test scores come from classrooms where black educators are teaching black students? How can parents negotiate with schools to prevent having their children placed in special education programs? Also included are teaching techniques and a list of exemplary schools that are successfully educating African Americans.

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