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Reading the Book of Isaiah : destruction and lament in the holy cities / Randall Heskett.

By: Heskett, Randall.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 213 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780230116856 (hardback); 023011685X (hardback).Subject(s): Bible. O.T. Isaiah -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Laments in the Bible
Contents:
Introduction -- A study of city laments : their form and function -- The city, destruction, and native Israelite genres -- Cities and nations and city of God -- The divine council -- Babylon the great -- Cyrus : Messiah, restorer, and temple builder -- City-lament motifs in Isaiah 49-55 -- Concluding remarks, a lament for today, and theological reflection.
Summary: "Many scholars have approached both the origins of ancient city laments in some of the oldest Sumerian texts and how this "genre" found its way into the Tanakh/Old Testament. Randall Heskett goes a step further. He uses both historical criticism and a form-critical approach to analyze and assess Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities as oral traditions of ancient Israelite prophetic genres. He also shows how a later exilic/post-exilic redactional framework may have semantically transformed older prophetic genres about destruction and restoration to be reflexes of the events around 587 BCE"--Provided by publisher.Summary: "Many scholars have approached both the origins of ancient city laments in some of the oldest Sumerian texts and how this "genre" found its way into the Tanakh/Old Testament. However, no one has treated Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities form-critically as oral traditions of ancient Israelite prophetic genres. Neither have scholars shown how a later exilic/post-exilic redactional framework may have semantically transformed older prophetic genres about destruction and restoration to be reflexes of the events around 587 BCE. Since much of the greater book of Isaiah responds to the destruction of the cities of Judah and the capitol city of Jerusalem, the homecoming of the exiles, and the rebuilding of Jerusalem, this monograph will treat the original oral levels of tradition history and later exilic/post-exilic redactional levels of "Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities in the Scroll of Isaiah..." Finally, the concluding chapter will address city laments within biblical theology and how they may inform such events as the destruction of our own twin towers on 9-11"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book *Schaff Library
Stacks
BS 1515.25 .H47 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 30092101089317
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- A study of city laments : their form and function -- The city, destruction, and native Israelite genres -- Cities and nations and city of God -- The divine council -- Babylon the great -- Cyrus : Messiah, restorer, and temple builder -- City-lament motifs in Isaiah 49-55 -- Concluding remarks, a lament for today, and theological reflection.

"Many scholars have approached both the origins of ancient city laments in some of the oldest Sumerian texts and how this "genre" found its way into the Tanakh/Old Testament. Randall Heskett goes a step further. He uses both historical criticism and a form-critical approach to analyze and assess Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities as oral traditions of ancient Israelite prophetic genres. He also shows how a later exilic/post-exilic redactional framework may have semantically transformed older prophetic genres about destruction and restoration to be reflexes of the events around 587 BCE"--Provided by publisher.

"Many scholars have approached both the origins of ancient city laments in some of the oldest Sumerian texts and how this "genre" found its way into the Tanakh/Old Testament. However, no one has treated Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities form-critically as oral traditions of ancient Israelite prophetic genres. Neither have scholars shown how a later exilic/post-exilic redactional framework may have semantically transformed older prophetic genres about destruction and restoration to be reflexes of the events around 587 BCE. Since much of the greater book of Isaiah responds to the destruction of the cities of Judah and the capitol city of Jerusalem, the homecoming of the exiles, and the rebuilding of Jerusalem, this monograph will treat the original oral levels of tradition history and later exilic/post-exilic redactional levels of "Lamentation and Restoration of Destroyed Cities in the Scroll of Isaiah..." Finally, the concluding chapter will address city laments within biblical theology and how they may inform such events as the destruction of our own twin towers on 9-11"--Provided by publisher.

8/2012 90.00 (81.00)

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